Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Sable Island is a small piece of land situated around 200 miles southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The island was inhabited, originally by sealers, shipwreck survivors, and salvagers known as “wreckers.” To address the number of shipwrecks occurring in the area, the governor of Nova Scotia established several life-saving stations on the island in the early 19th century. Over the course of several years, a humanitarian settlement was established for rescued seamen and women. Uninhabited since the late 19th century, the island now serves as an important science research center. It also, coincidentally, is home to several hundred horses.

The Sable Island horse, also known as the Sable Island pony, is a small, feral horse found only on Sable Island. In 1960, the Canadian government approved legislation to protect these feral horses. In the decades since, noninvasive herd and genetic analyses have been conducted on the group of horses. Otherwise, the herd is unmanaged and not subjected to any kind of interference. These horses generally stand at around 55 inches tall and weigh around 800 pounds.

Visiting this island is notoriously difficult, but the payoff is immense. The island is protected and managed by Parks Canada, which must grant permission to anyone wanting to visit. In 2013, Sable Island became a National Park Reserve; visitors must observe utmost environmental respect. Though not particularly accessible (the island can only be reached by plane or ship), tour companies have begun taking visitors. The trips are expensive, but travelers are rewarded with unique views of plants, animals, and—of course—horses.

Categories: Vacation Spots

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