Category: Vacation Spots

Arkansas Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Cold Springs Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 417 2190 E. Main Booneville, AR 72927 (501) 675-3233  

Fourche Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 459 Hwy. 10 E. Danville, AR 72833 (501) 495-2844  

Caddo Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 912 Smokey Bear Lane Glenwood, AR 71943 (870) 356-4186  

Jessieville Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 189 8607 Hwy. 7 N. Jessieville, AR 71949 (501) 984-5313  

Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism One Capitol Mall Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 1-888-AT-PARKS (V/TT) (501) 682-7777 (V/TT)  

Mena Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 1603 Hwy. 71 N Mena, AR 71953 (501) 394-2382  

Womble Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 255 Mount Ida, AR 71957 (870) 867-2101 

Lonesome D Horse and RV Park 776 Cravens Lane New Blaine, Arkansas 72851 Phone 501-938-2899 or 501-938-0149 E-mail: Bjwtnwalkers@aol.com Directions: Lonesome D Horse and RV Park located in New Blaine, 20 miles south of I-40. Traveling from east or west, exit I-40 at Clarksville, onto Hwy 164 west. Then take State Hwy 109 south about 13 miles to State Hwy 22. Turn left and travel approx 2.5 miles. Lonesome D camp sign on right at Cravens Road. Campground approximately 2 miles in on Cravens Road. Facillities: over 30 sites – all with electric and water hook-ups. All camp sites have corrals for horses. Modern bath/toilet facilities and easy access to over 75 miles of horse trails that wind through out the Ozark-St.Francis National Forest. Trails: Most trails are well groomed and are comprised of old logging roads and cut trails. Still many miles of primitive trails that wind through some of the most scenic country the mid-west has to offer. Many creek, river, and waterfall crossings.  

Oden Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 332 Hwy. 88 W Oden, AR 71961 (870) 326-4322  

Winona Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 1039 Hwy. 10 N. Perryville, AR 72126 (501) 889-5176  

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests USDA Forest Service 605 West Main Street Russellville, AR 72801-3614 Phone: 501-968-2354  

Perry’s Passin’ Thru Bed, Barn & Brew Jacci Perry 21365 Perry Road Springdale, AR 72764 479-756-6969 Location: east of Springdale, AR. Facilities: 5 stall barn with wash bay. Pets are welcomed. It’s $20/night for stall/&hookups or $135/master bedroom/bath & $90/guest bedroom/bath.  

Poteau Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 2255 Waldron, AR 72958 (501) 637-4174 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Arizona Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Bear Wallow Wilderness 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: From Alpine, take US 191 south for 30 miles to Forest Road 25. 

Elevation: 9093 ft. 11,080 acres Ponderosa pine forest. The Bear Wallow 

Creek flows year-around. Season: roads may not be open in winter 

Users: hike, horse 

Blue Crossing 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 22 miles southeast of Alpine on US 180, then on Forest 

Route 281. Elevation 6200ft. Description: 4 camping sites. No horse facilities 

Access to the Blue Range Primitive Area. Season: April – November 

Users: hike, horse 

Blue Range Primitive Area 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: 520-339-4384 

Directions: South of Alpine on US 191 or Forest Route 201. 193,762-acre 

Description: rugged mountains, steep canyons, and ridges. The Mogollon 

Rim crosses the area from east to west. Season: May- October 

Users: hike, horse 

Escudilla National Recreation Trail 

Alpine Ranger District 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: 520-339-4384 

Direction: From the town of Alpine, drive north on US 191 to Forest Road 

56, go right, travel 4 miles to Terry Flat, turn left past Tool Box Draw, from 

here it is 1/2 mile to the trailhead. Three miles of well-marked trails 

Description: aspen groves, forest and meadows in the White Mountains. 

Season: May – October Users: hike, horse 

Escudilla Wilderness 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: From Alpine go northeast on US 191 and forest road 56 for 11 miles 

Season: May – October Users: horse, hike 

 
Hannagan 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 23 miles south of Alpine on US 191. Elevation. 9100 ft 

Facilities: 8 camp sites, No horse facilities Access to Blue Range Primitive Area. 

Season: May-October Users: hike, horse 

KP Cienega 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 29 miles southwest of Alpine on US 191 and forest road 155 

Elevation: 9000 ft Facilities: 5 camping units, Corrals. Trailhead access to Blue 

Range Primitive Area. Season: May-September Users: hike, horse 

Lost Dutchman State Park 

Apache Junction, AZ 

Phone: (602) 982-4485 

Mailing address: 

Arizona State Parks 

1300 W. Washington 

Phoenix, AZ 85007 

Directions: Travel east from Apache Junction on US Highway 88, turn north and go 

5 miles to the State Park. Located at the base of the Superstition Mountains. 

Season: year round Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

BS Ranch     
Bob & Susan Walter 
44099 Palo Verde 
PO Box 784 
Bouse, Az. 85325 
Tel:  928-851-2247     
  

Electric hookup, sewer, water, phone, internet, washing machine 

2 round pens, 5 covered pipe corrals, large run out area, open desert and mountain riding–miles and miles of open road 

Cedar Bench Wilderness 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From I-17 take exit 278, take forest road 372 east (off forest road 136). 

Elevation: 4500-6700 feet. 16,005 acres Two trails Season: year round 

Users: hike, horse 

Fossil Springs Wilderness 

Beaver Creek Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

P.O. Box 670 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4421 

Directions: From I- 17 travel south to AZ 260 then to forest road 708. 

Season: summer Users: hike, horse 

Mingus Mountain Trailhead 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 E. Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: 520.567.4121 

Directions: From Jerome go southwest for 6 miles on AZ 89A, 3 miles 

southeast on Forest Route 104 Elevation: 7600 ft. Trailhead to the 

Woodchute Wilderness. Season: May- October Fee 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Pine Mountain Wilderness 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From I-17 go east on County Road 171 and then onto forest 

road 68. Acres: 20,100 Description: desert mountains, mesas and 

canyons. 6 maintained trails. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Potato Patch Trailhead 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 E. Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: 520.567.4121 

Direction: From Jerome travel southwest for 7 miles on AZ 89A & .5 mile 

on forest road 106. 7000` elevation. Trailhead accesses Woodchute 

Wilderness. Season: May – October Fees Users: hike, horse 

Mazatzal Wilderness 

Cave Creek Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

P. O. Box 5068 

Carefree, AZ 85377 

Phone: (602) 488-3441 

Directions: From Camp Verde, take AZ 260 to forest road 708 then to 

forest road 502. Elevation: 2060 ft – 7903 ft Acres: 252,500 

Discription: Sonoran desert and uplands, canyons, pinyon and juniper 

The trail that follows the verde river is a favorite with equestrians. 

The Mazatzal Divide Route, runs 29 miles through the center of the 

wilderness. Not all trails are considered appropriate for horses. 

Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Woodchute Wilderness 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From Cottonwood, go west 10 miles on AZ 60. Acres: 5,923 

Elevation: 5,500 ft – 7,800 ft. Description: spectacular views of the San 

Francisco Peaks One maintained trail. No horse facilities Season: 

March – October Users: hike, horse  

Campground Buena Tierra 

1995 S. Cox Road 

Casa Grande, AZ 85222 

(520) 836-3500 Toll Free: (888) 520-8360 Fax: (520) 836-9723 

Description: With over 100 campsites, some very large, Campground Buena 

Tierra gives you privacy and room to relax. There is a large picnic area, a 

volleyball court and huge fire pits that are ideal for groups or just one or 

two persons. Alone or with friends, feel free to explore the many riding 

trails which are perfect for biking, hiking and horseback riding (we have 

horse corrals here for overnighters and seasonal campers alike). 

Full Circle Ranch Bed and Breakfast Inn 

40205 North 26th Street 

Cave Creek, Arizona 85027 

Ph:(623) 465-7570 

Fax:(623) 465-7579    

Apache Creek Wilderness 

Prescott National Forest 

735 North Highway 89 

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Phone: (520) 636-2302 

Directions: From Prescott, take County Road 5 to County Road 8 to 95A, 

which is an unpaved four wheel drive road. Elevations: 5200 to 6900 feet. 

Description: Rolling hills, conifers, and riparian areas. There are no maintained 

trails . No horse facilities   Season: year round Users: hike, horse

 

Juniper Mesa Wilderness 

Chino Valley Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

735 North Highway 89 

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Phone: (520) 636-2302 

Directions: From I-40 take exit 109 south on Anvil Rock Road (forest road 125). 

Elevation: 5,600 feet – 7,000 feet Description: Mesa and canyons. No water. 

7 maintained trails. Season: year round No horse facilities Users: hike, horse 

Chiricahua Wilderness 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Road 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Willcox, take AZ 186 south to Chiricahua National Monument, 

and then go east on forest road 42. 10,290 acre. Season: year around 

Users: hike, horse 

Cochise Stronghold Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Sunsites travel west on US 191 and 7 miles on forest road 84 

Elevation: 5000 ft.   Season: year round Fees  Users: hike, horse 

Pinery Canyon Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal, travel west on forest road 42 for 18 miles. 

Elevation 7000 ft. Season: year round Users: hike, bike, horse 

Rustler Park Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal, travel west on forest road 42D for 18 miles 

Elevation: 8500 ft. Trailhead to the Chiricahua Wilderness. 

Season: April-November Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

Stewart Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal travel southwest for 2 miles on forest road 42. 

Elevation: 5100 ft Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Sunny Flat Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal go southwest on forest road 42 for 3 miles 

Elevation: 5200 ft Season: year round Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

West Turkey Creek 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Rd 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Willcox, travel southeast on AZ 186 and 181, then on 

forest road 42 for 23 miles Elevation: 5900 ft Season: year round 

Users hike, bike, horse 

And The Horse You Rode In On B & B 

Deb Scott 

P.O. Box 158 

Dragoon, AZ 85609 

phone: (520) 826-5410 fax: (520) 826-1078 

Located on 600+ acres one hour east of Tucson in the foothills of the Dragoon Mts. 2400 West Dragoon 

Rd. Dragoon, AZ (I-10 Exit 318, then 7.3 miles on Dragoon Rd) Four guest rooms, ten guest stalls and 

a round pen. Ride out right from our corrals. 

Strayhorse Campground and Trailhead 

Clifton Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

HC1, Box 733 

Duncan, AZ 85534 

Phone: (520)687-1301 

Directions: Located 26 miles south of Alpine on US 191 Elevation: 8200 ft. 

Facilities: 7 camping units with picnic tables, grills and corrals. Two major 

trails: Highline National Recreation Trail and Raspberry Trail 

Season: April – November Users: hike, horse 

Rancho Milagro Bed and Breakfast 

P.O. Box 981, 11 East Camino Del Corral 

Sonoita, AZ 85637 

Elgin, Arizona 

520-455-0381 

Innkeepers: Karen Leonard and Michael Johnson 

Kachina Parks Wilderness 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Hwy. 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff take 180 north to forest road 516. Elevation: 7,400 ft -12,643 ft. 

Humphreys Peak, the highest point in AZ. Season: May- October Users: hike, horse

 

Coconino National Forest 

Supervisor`s Office 

2323 E. Greenlaw Lane 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

(520) 527-3600 FAX 527-3620 

Little Elden Springs Campground/Trailhead 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Highway 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff, travel northeast on US 89 and forest road 556 for 5 miles. Elevation 7200 ft. 

Facilities: 16 camp sites, horse facilities. Season: May-September Fees Reservations accepted 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Red Rock Secret Mountain Wilderness 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Highway 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff travel south for 20 miles, the wilderness can be reached off Route 66/ forest 

road 231, US 89A and forest road 152, FR 152D, FR152C, and 525. Elevation: 2800 ft – 9000 ft. 

Description: red rock formations, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and century-old homesteads. Season: March 

-October Users: hike, horse 

Indian Hollow Trailhead 

North Kaibab Ranger District 

Kaibab National Forest 

P.O. Box 248 

Fredonia, AZ 86022 

Phone: (520) 643-7395 

Directions: From Fredonia, go south for 50 miles taking routes 22 to 425 to 232 Elevation: 6000 ft. 

Wilderness access trailhead Season: May-November Users: hike, horse 

Saddle Mountain Wilderness 

North Kaibab Ranger District 

Kaibab National Forest 

P.O. Box 248 

Fredonia, AZ 96202 

Phone: (520) 643-7395 

Directions: From Jacob Lake, take AZ 67 to forest road 610 & FR 611. Elevation: 6000 ft – 8000 ft. 

This wilderness borders Grand Canyon National Park. Season: May – October Users: hike, horse 

Icehouse CCC Campground/Trailhead 

Globe Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

Route 1, Box 33 

Globe, AZ 88501 

Phone: (520) 402-6200 

Directions: From Globe go south for 6 miles on forest road 112. Elevation: 4,000 ft. Season: year 

round NO Horse facilities Users: hike, horse 

Salt River Canyon Wilderness 

Globe Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

Route 1, Box 33 

Globe, AZ 85501 

Phone: (602) 225-5200 

Directions: From Globe, travel north AZ 288. Acres: 32,100 Description: very rugged, and fantastic 

vistas. Elevations: 2,200 ft – 4,200 ft. Access to this wilderness is difficult, and is mostly done at the Salt 

River. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Grand Canyon National Park 

P. O. Box 129 

Grand Canyon, AZ 86023 

Phone: (520) 638-7888 

Location: North of Williams on Arizona State Highway 64, north on US Highway 180. The north rim can be 

accessed from Jacob Lake via a scenic byway. Season: year round Fees Reservations: yes 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Kehl Springs Trailhead 

Mogollon Rim Center 

Coconino National Forest 

H.C. 31, Box 300 

Happy Jack, AZ 86024 

Phone: (520) 477-2255 

Directions: From Happy Jack travel south on AZ 87 and then travel for 29 miles on forest road 300 

Elevation: 7500 ft Season: year round Users: hike, bike, horse 

Miller Peak Wilderness 

Sierra Vista Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

5990 S. Hwy 92 

Hereford, AZ 85615 

Phone: (520) 378-0311 

Location: Located 6 miles south of Sierra Vista in the Huachuca Mountains Elevation: 5200ft – 9466 ft. 

21 well maintained trails Season: year round Users hike, horse 

Ramsey Vista Campground/Trailhead 

Sierra Vista Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

5990 South Highway 92 

Hereford, AZ 85615 

Phone: (520) 378-0311 

Directions: From Sierra Vista, travel southwest on AZ 92 and forest road 368 for 14 miles. Elevation 

7200 ft Season: year round Fees No horse facilities Users: hike, bike, horse 

Arrastra Mountain Wilderness 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Wickenburg travel northwest on US Highway 93 take the Bagdad turnoff (Hwy 97). 

Elevations: to 5000 feet. Season: year round Users hike, horse 

Mount Nutt Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Kingman, take -I40 south for 3 miles to the Oatman Road exit. Travel 10 miles west to 

Navaho Road turn west on Navaho Road, continue 2 miles Description: steep canyons. Season: year 

round Users: hike, horse 

Mount Wilson Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Ave. 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 692-4400 

Directions: From Kingman, travel 50 miles north on US 93 to the Temple Bar Road, continue on paved 

road for 8 miles to an unpaved jeep trail. Elevation: 5445 feet at the summit of Mount Wilson. Season: 

year round Users: hike, horse 

Mohave County Fairgrounds 

2600 Fairgrounds Blvd. 

KINGMAN, AZ 86401 

Ph: 520-753-2636 Office:520-753-1904 

Directions: From I-40 take Stockton Hill Rd. exit Facilities: 250 – 10×10 outdoor covered box stalls, 

water available year round, and RV hookups. Open 24 hours Night watch person on duty. Fees 

Tres Alamos Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 85401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: Take Highway 93 to the Lake Alamo Road, travel 6.5 miles west to an intersection, take the 

right fork, and go 7 miles to the wilderness. Acres: 8300 Description: ridges, canyons, and washes 

Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Upper Burro Creek Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Phoenix take US 93 to highway 97 ( Bagdad turnoff) then take the road to Upper Burro 

Creek. This road is steep and requires a four wheel drive. Description: Acres: 27,440 Season: year 

round Users: hike, horse 

Wabayuma Peak Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Ave 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 692-4400 

Directions: : From Hualapai Mountain County Park go 20 miles on BLM road 2123. Acres: 40,000 

.Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Warm Springs Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Gibraltar Mountain Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Avenue 

Lake Havasu, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Directions: From I-10 west, exit at Quartizite, take AZ 95 toward Parker, to AZ 72, turning west toward 

Parker, 2 miles south of Parker turn east onto Shea Road and follow this paved road for 5 miles. 

Description: volcanic rock, and sandy canyons. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Harcuvar Mountains Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Ave. 

Lake Havasu City, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Directions: From Wenden travel north on AZ 60 to Alamo Dam Access road. Elevations: 2400 feet 

5100 feet. Season: year round Users: horse, hike 

Rawhide Mountains Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Ave. 

Lake Havasu City, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Location: From Kingman travel south on I-40 for 22 miles to Yucca, take Alamo Road. Description: A 

river, deep gorge, mountains, side canyons and waterfalls Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Castle Creek Wilderness 

Bradshaw Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

2230 East Highway 69 

Prescott, AZ 86301 

Phone: (520) 445-7253 

Directions: From Prescott, take forest road 61 south to forest road 56 to forest road 52. Elevation: 2800 

ft – 7000 ft. 25,517-acres. Spectacular views Nine maintained trails. Season: year round Users: 

hike, horse 

West Clear Creek Wilderness 

Beaver Creek Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

HC 64, Box 240 

Rimrock, AZ 86335 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: 35 miles east of Camp Verde. Trail starts at Bull Pen Ranch Season: March- October 

Users: hike, horse 

Categories: Blog Vacation Spots

Alabama Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Russell Cave National Monument 3729 County Road 98, Bridgeport, AL, 35740, Phone: 205-495-2672 Located in the northeastern corner of Alabama close to the Tennessee border. Can be accessed via U.S. Highway 72. Users: hikers, horses.  

Edgar Hood 459 Brownsboro Road Brownsboro, AL 35741 256-883-8615 barn, 256-776-9177 Web Site: http://www.3hstables.com E-mail: threehst@knology.net Bold Destiny Bedford V Cash Memorial Horse Trail Tuskegee National Forest, 334-727-2652. Directions: From I-85, take exit 42 and go east on AL 186. Turn left on forest road 905 (just past the Forest Service office sign). Trailhead is at the “T” of forest Road 905 and forest road 906. Trailhead has a small parking area. 14 miles of trail Description: rolling hills and woods. Overnight camping permits needed Users: hike, horse  

Caude Kelly State Park Uriah, AL Directions: From I-65 take Hwy 21 north for 15 miles, to a bridge located on the county line, cross the bridge and take the next right. Trails Fees  

Little River Canyon WMA Ft. Payne, Directions: From Ft. Payne take Hwy 35 south, after crossing the Little River Canyon, take the first paved road to the left (County Rd 103). Trail head is 1/2 mile on the left. Trail head has small parking area, 30 + miles of marked and unmarked trails. Description: views, rolling hills, rocks, and river crossings. 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in North Dakota, is a must-visit destination for horse lovers. These animals represent a huge attraction for many of the park’s visitors. The feral horses here do not fall under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, but are instead managed by existing park regulations. For many years, the National Park Service attempted to remove all horses from the park, but the policy was reversed in 1970 when the horse was recognized as part of the historical setting.

The park is home to numerous bands, or groups, of horses, representing the experience Theodore Roosevelt may have had during the open range ranching era. The feral horses are preserved as a cultural resource. During the summer months, the horses may be seen grazing throughout the park. They are most often seen along the park boundary from Interstate 94. They can also be seen from high points, such as the Painted Canyon Overlook and Buck Hill. While there are no official horse tours operating inside the park, visitors are likely to see bands while hiking and exploring.

The feral horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park move in bands of 5-15 animals. Each group has an established social hierarchy. Once formed, the social group will remain remarkably stable and often range within an established territory. Foals are born in the spring after an 11-month gestation period. Horse numbers have been historically managed at the park through periodic roundups. Removed horses are sold at public auction. However, the park is exploring alternative methods for herd management, including contraceptives, low-stress livestock herding, corral trapping, an adoption program, and various genetics research.

The Park advises visitors to exercise extreme caution while attempting to observe feral horses closely. Binoculars are advised for optimal viewing. Horses have a very acute sense of smell, hearing, and sight, and they are extremely wary of humans. Visitors are prohibited from feeding, chasing, harassing, and otherwise approaching the horses.

 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, Wyoming

The Cowboy State has vast valleys, snow-capped mountains, and more than its share of feral horse populations. If you’re in search of an adventure-filled but horse-oriented Montana vacation, head to Lovell, Wyoming, home to the Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center. This organization is dedicated to preserving the future of the wild horses of the Pyror Mountains. These animals continue to roam freely in the Pryor Mountains just outside of Lovell, and they’ve been in the area for nearly 200 years.

The Pryor Mountain horses are special for several reasons. They’re stunning, there are a lot of them, and they have a unique history. The herd has a Colonial Spanish American heritage; they were derived from the horses of Portugal and Spain. If lost in any capacity, the herd cannot be restored. Its biological viability and history must be preserved—this is the mission of the Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center.

Visitors to the Wild Mustang Center have the opportunity to learn about the herd’s history and geographical significance. Visitors are educated to learn about the dynamics of a mustang herd, the social interactions within individual bands, and the mustang’s place alongside other wild species in the area. You will be able to view the mustangs in-person while learning about how the National Park Service works to preserve and promote a genetically viable herd of horses.

Tour season begins in May and runs through October. A full day trip begins at the Mustang Center and includes travel to the base of the Pyror Mountains. The views are nearly as spectacular as the horses, presenting a unique hiking trip horse lovers will never forget. Mustangs are likely visible for the duration of the tour, and it is recommended that participants be comfortable with hiking and high altitudes.

 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Oatman, Arizona

Oatman, Arizona is a town in the Black Mountains of Mohave County, Arizona. The compound began as a small mining camp during the gold rush. In 1915, two prospectors found over $10 million in gold; in the months following this discovery, Oatman’s population swelled to more than 3,500 people (up from just a couple dozen). In recent years, the town has experienced a tourism renaissance; laying close to Route 66, road tripping visitors stop in the tiny town to see the old buildings, gorgeous mountains, and the famous wild burros.

The wild burros of Oatman are descended from pack animals turned loose by early prospectors. Each morning, they wander into town looking for food. These burros roam freely through the streets of Oatman, feeding on treats provided by tourists. The burros are gentle, but wild—signs posted throughout the town advise visitors to exercise caution. However, tourists are welcome to approach, pet, and feed the burros without fear of disciplinary action. Currently, the animals are protected by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Oatman offers more than the ability to pet wild burros. A standard weekend in this town can include anything from classic car rallies to staged “Wild West” shootouts. The town is fiercely proud of its Route 66 heritage, selling souvenirs for tourists passing through on their way west. The town has a high desert climate and is significantly cooler in both summer and winter than the surrounding area, making it an excellent place to stop and spend a few days.

 

 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Sable Island is a small piece of land situated around 200 miles southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The island was inhabited, originally by sealers, shipwreck survivors, and salvagers known as “wreckers.” To address the number of shipwrecks occurring in the area, the governor of Nova Scotia established several life-saving stations on the island in the early 19th century. Over the course of several years, a humanitarian settlement was established for rescued seamen and women. Uninhabited since the late 19th century, the island now serves as an important science research center. It also, coincidentally, is home to several hundred horses.

The Sable Island horse, also known as the Sable Island pony, is a small, feral horse found only on Sable Island. In 1960, the Canadian government approved legislation to protect these feral horses. In the decades since, noninvasive herd and genetic analyses have been conducted on the group of horses. Otherwise, the herd is unmanaged and not subjected to any kind of interference. These horses generally stand at around 55 inches tall and weigh around 800 pounds.

Visiting this island is notoriously difficult, but the payoff is immense. The island is protected and managed by Parks Canada, which must grant permission to anyone wanting to visit. In 2013, Sable Island became a National Park Reserve; visitors must observe utmost environmental respect. Though not particularly accessible (the island can only be reached by plane or ship), tour companies have begun taking visitors. The trips are expensive, but travelers are rewarded with unique views of plants, animals, and—of course—horses.

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Outer Banks, North Carolina

North Carolina’s Outer Banks is a 200-mile-long string of barrier islands splitting the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. A popular tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known around the world for their strange subtropical climate and the wide expanse of open, available beachfront. Visitors have the opportunity to camp out, swim at leisure, and browse the shipwrecks just off the coast. However, the Outer Banks are known for more than the “Graveyard of the Atlantic” and ample beachfront opportunities—they’re also known for feral horses.

The horses living on these islands are sometimes called “banker ponies.” According to local legend, they are descended from Spanish Mustangs who washed ashore in one of the centuries-old shipwrecks. Visitors can spot populations of feral horses on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

In the 16th and 17th centuries, the horse population on these subtropical islands grew enormously; thousands of feral horses ran free along the islands. However, the increase in nearby beach resort popularity has made a dramatic impact on their habitat. Many conservationists feat that the horses might vanish altogether. Due to high levels of inbreeding, the herds lack necessary genetic diversity. Unfortunately, the also impedes the horse population’s survival.

If, however, you travel to this part of the country to spot feral horses, take care to search primarily in wildlife sanctuaries; visitors are asked to stay at least fifty feet away from the horses. However, horses are occasionally spotted in areas with higher human traffic. They spend time digging for fresh water near saltwater cordgrass.

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Area

Colorado has everything: hiking, skiing, fishing, kayaking, and—unbeknownst to many visitors—a massive feral horse population. Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Area is one of the best spots to view these majestic creatures; the area’s 36,000 acres of plateaus and canyons are home to between 120 and 150 horses. Local legend has it that these horses carry the genetics of the native ponies owned by the Utes, who lived in the area.

The Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Area is managed for several uses, but feral horse conservation is a primary concern. The rugged landscape means that these horses are best accessed by bike, horseback, or the hiking trails winding throughout the area. For the best views, visit Indian Park and North Soda in the summer and Coal Canyon or Main Canyon in the winter.

The Little Book Cliffs wild horses boast a diversity of colors, band sizes, and ages. They include palominos, paints, grays, blacks, bays, sorrels, blue and red roans, and even a few appaloosas. Within the past few years, a curly was introduced to the herd and has since foaled. The incredibly photogenic herds are beloved by both locals and tourists. In fact, due to high public visitation, these feral horses are less skittish than others around the country.

Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse area is just eight miles northeast of Grand Junction. The wild horse area is characterized by four major canyon systems. While here, do your best to spot elk, turkey, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, quail, rattlesnakes, snowshoe hare, mountain lion, bobcat, and bear.

Categories: Vacation Spots

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: The Virginia Range, Nevada

Nevada is home to nearly half of America’s free-roaming horse population. Though the state is expansive, many of these horses are part of the Virginia Range herd, which occupies a region in the western part of the state. This famous herd is often referred to as “Annie’s Horses,” after the decades-long crusade of “Wild Horse Annie,” or Velma Johnston. Johnston worked to protect free-roaming and feral horses across America, and she hailed from Nevada. These horses, allegedly, inspired her campaign.

Annie and these horses also inspired The Wild Horse Annie Act. Johnston became aware of the ruthless manner in which feral horses were rounded up in Nevada; ranchers, hunters, and “mustangers” were responsible for harvesting wild horses for commercial purposes, pointing up an important lapse in animals rights upholding. Johnston’s grassroots campaign, which primarily involved school children, worked to bring these topics into the public eye.

The campaign worked—the public became enraged by the issue—local and national newspapers published articles about the exploitation of the feral horses. Finally, in January of 1959, Nevada Congressman Walter Baring introduced a bill prohibiting the use of motorized vehicles to hunt wild horses and burros on public lands. The bill unanimously passed and became public law in September of 1959.

Visitors can see these magnificent horses by hiking the trails east of Reno. They gather around watering holes, so tread lightly near water. For more information about Wild Horse Annie and her spectacular mustangs, see the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros’ website. Travelers will delight in the hiking, beauty, and accessibility of this U.S. horse destination.

Categories: Vacation Spots