Author: Gabriella Lowe

Colorado Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Jones Livery & Ranch 

PO Box 1378 

20225 Country Road G 

Cortez, Colorado   81321 

Jones Livery & Ranch has been an operating cattle ranch for more than 100 years.  Owners Jerry and 

Carol Jones provide full-service boarding so you can relax and know your horses are receiving attentive care in a private, secure facility.  Short and long-term boarding and stabling is available for travelers, clinics, events, and vacations for both you and your horse. 

Sun Canyon Ranch -Lodge, Horse Hotel, B & B, Campground 

Mac, Gloria, and Meaghan McMahon 

02082 road 8, Box 860 

Dove Creek, Co 81324 

Toll free 866-737-3377 

Location: 6 miles north of Dove Creek, Colorado on Rd 8 ,in the scenic and rugged 4 corners area of 

southwest Colorado. Minutes from Mesa Verde, Telluride, Monument Valley and the magnificent Dolores 

River Canyon. Facilities: One of the finest facilities on the western slope. Heated wash stall and stable. 

Turn outs, Trails and a view to die for. Also available, accommodations for “horsey” people. 

Winding River Resort 

PO Box 629 

Grand Lake 

 Colorado 80447 

970-627-3215 or 303-623-1121 fax your request to 970-627-5003 

Lodging and camping near Rocky Mountain National Park. Accommodations at Winding River Resort 

include cabins, lodge rooms and 150 spacious RV and tent sites in the Colorado mountains. Our setting on 

the North Fork of the Colorado River, bordering Rocky Mountain National Park and the Arapahoe National 

Forest, offers you limitless beauty and recreation 

Mule Creek Outfitters -M Lazy C Ranch 

Randy and Brenda Myers 

P. O. Box 461 

Lake George, CO 80827 

Phone: 1-800-289-4868  

The M Lazy C Ranch is a family owned, working cattle ranch. 

Summertime is our busiest time of the year and a spectacular time to enjoy the many activities here at 

the ranch. Horseback riding, hay rides with chuck wagon meals, overnight pack trips, cattle drives, hiking 

and just plain relaxation. There are always ranch chores for those willing to give it a try. With the coming 

of Fall, Colorado’s Aspen turn the mountain sides into a golden showcase. The Winter months provide for 

cross country skiing and sleigh rides. No matter which season is your favorite, we have activities for you 

to enjoy all year long. 

Limon Hotel CO – Colorado Bed and Breakfast Ranch Inn 

Hosts: John and Beth Craig 

50452 County Road 23 – 

Limon, Colorado 80828 

A world away from hotel lodging, our 15,000 acre cattle ranch–just 10 minutes from the hustle and bustle 

of Interstate 70 in Limon, Colorado–provides a peaceful retreat and country pleasures. Bring your horse 

and find your “inner-cowboy” and ride the range! 

HORSE MOTEL Trail Horses of Colorado 

316 County Rd F-45 

Penrose, Colorado 81240 

(719) 372-6051  

Located 25 miles South of Colorado Springs off Hwy 115 

Angel Ridge Ranch 

Denise Fisher 

177 County Road # 10 

Ridgway, Colorado 81432 

(970) 626-4287   

Ouray County Fairgrounds 

P.O. Box 28, corner hwy. 550 & 62 

Ridgway, CO 81432 

Tel: 970-626-9775 or 626-2626 after business hours or weekends. 

Location: 80 miles north of Durango. Corner of Hwys. 550 & 62 in Ridgway, Colorado. Facilities: 20 12′ 

x12′ stalls, 10 holding pens, water, outdoor arena, trails nearby, ample parking. Vet/farrier on call. 

Reservations required. 

Categories: Vacation Spots

California Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

GreenStone Ranch & Inn 1655 Tryon Road, P.O. Box 1285 Angels Camp, CA 95222 Phone: (209) 736-4466 Fax: (209) 736-2772 Email: info@greenstoneinn.com Website: www.greenstoneinn.com 

GreenStone Ranch & Inn is offered as a vacation rental to accommodate families of 6-10 and people who travel with horses (room to accommodate six horses). Centrally located in the Calaveras County, just minutes from lakes, caves, many historic sites, Big Trees State Park, and many wineries.  

Burney Mountain Guest Ranch P.O. Box 1426 Burney, CA 96013 (530) 335-4087 E-mail info@burneymtn.com Web site: http://burneymtn.com/ Family-owned and operated Guest Ranch located 9 miles east of Burney, CA. 16-stall barn offers lodging for guest horses. The Pacific Crest Trail crosses our driveway for miles of trails. Burney Mountain Guest Ranch sits on 114 acres surrounded by BLM and PGE land. New cedar cabins surround our casting pond. Your stay includes 3 meals a day served family-style in the main lodge. Swimming Pool, pool table, horseshoe pit, guided trail rides available. 

Orange Blossom Ranch Overnight Stabling & Horse HotelDiane Schumann – George Ross 4760 Orange Blossom Lane Chino, CA 91710 909-628-4265 909-627-9502 info@orangeblossomranch.com Box stalls, working pen, hot walker. Parking space and many more extras.  

FRENCH CREEK COTTAGE Ruth & Mark Hartman ETNA, CALIFORNIA 1-800-484-4869 PIN 0783 It is a three-bedroom 2 bath cottage that sleeps 11. And lots of pasture for the horses!  

Ricochet Ridge Ranch Lari Shea, Owner / Manager 24201 N. Highway 1 Ft. Bragg, CA 95437 Phone: 707-964-7669 Fax: 707-964-9669 larishea@horse-vacation.com http://www.horse-vacation.com/ Beach and redwood forest vacations on Northern California’s magnificent Mendocino coast. Ride the coastal beaches of MacKerricher State Park and through majestic Redwood forests. Lodging, fine dining, and entertainment at unique Bed and Breakfast Inns.  

Stagecoach Trails – R.V., Equestrian and Wildlife Resort Robert & Michelle Crofts, 7878 Great Southern Overland Stage Rt. of 1849 Julian, CA 92036 Tel: 760-765-2197; 1-877-TWO-CAMP; Fax: 760-765-1606 E-Mail: reservations@stagecoachtrails.com Web Site: http://www.stagecoachtrails.com Facilities: 75 horse corrals, 2 round pens & 285 full camper hookups. Vacation trailers by corrals, 2 night minimum stay, 24 hour security, heated pool, nature hikes, tent area, country store and adjacent to 60,000 acres of Anza Borrego Desert State Park for your riding pleasure. Location: 16 miles southeast of Julian, Call for directions.  

3-D Ranch Vicki Donovan or Lee Luft 20567 Conestoga Trail Redding, Ca 96003 Phone: (530) 549-4999 E-mail: 3dranch@shasta.com Location: Five minutes from I-5. Facilities: indoor box stalls, holding pens, pastures, large lighted arena, round pen, and miles of trails. Electric and water hook-ups for self-contained RVs. $20 per night, $100 per week.  

Fairhaven Ranch Marc & Sandie Taylor 30803 La Ray Ln. TEMECULA, Ca 92596 Ph. 909/ 926-0226 or 926-9660 or 237-4423 Call for reservations Location: 2 m. E. of I-215. 7 m. N. of Temecula. 1hr. N. of San Diego Facilities: Show barn with 9 indoor/outdoor stalls, outdoor arena, round pen, riding trails in abundance, 7 parking space for trailers. 3 2-bd/bath-guest house w/full kitchen, laundry room, large patio overlooking arena. Close to Diamond Valley Lake & Lake Skinner. 

Stanislaus County Fairgrounds 900 N. Broadway Turlock, CA 95380 (209) 668-1339 Directions: Take the Fulkerth Exit off Hwy 99, turn east towards the Wal-mart shopping center. Go thru 2 lights, before you get to the 3rd light turn right onto Soderquist Road to the horse entrance. Stalls for overnight boarding at $10.00/night. Rigs can be parked next to stalls. RV parking is also available with hookups at $16.00/per night. Call ahead to confirm price and availability. 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Arkansas Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Cold Springs Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 417 2190 E. Main Booneville, AR 72927 (501) 675-3233  

Fourche Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 459 Hwy. 10 E. Danville, AR 72833 (501) 495-2844  

Caddo Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 912 Smokey Bear Lane Glenwood, AR 71943 (870) 356-4186  

Jessieville Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 189 8607 Hwy. 7 N. Jessieville, AR 71949 (501) 984-5313  

Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism One Capitol Mall Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 1-888-AT-PARKS (V/TT) (501) 682-7777 (V/TT)  

Mena Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 1603 Hwy. 71 N Mena, AR 71953 (501) 394-2382  

Womble Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 255 Mount Ida, AR 71957 (870) 867-2101 

Lonesome D Horse and RV Park 776 Cravens Lane New Blaine, Arkansas 72851 Phone 501-938-2899 or 501-938-0149 E-mail: Bjwtnwalkers@aol.com Directions: Lonesome D Horse and RV Park located in New Blaine, 20 miles south of I-40. Traveling from east or west, exit I-40 at Clarksville, onto Hwy 164 west. Then take State Hwy 109 south about 13 miles to State Hwy 22. Turn left and travel approx 2.5 miles. Lonesome D camp sign on right at Cravens Road. Campground approximately 2 miles in on Cravens Road. Facillities: over 30 sites – all with electric and water hook-ups. All camp sites have corrals for horses. Modern bath/toilet facilities and easy access to over 75 miles of horse trails that wind through out the Ozark-St.Francis National Forest. Trails: Most trails are well groomed and are comprised of old logging roads and cut trails. Still many miles of primitive trails that wind through some of the most scenic country the mid-west has to offer. Many creek, river, and waterfall crossings.  

Oden Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 332 Hwy. 88 W Oden, AR 71961 (870) 326-4322  

Winona Ranger District Ouachita National Forest 1039 Hwy. 10 N. Perryville, AR 72126 (501) 889-5176  

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests USDA Forest Service 605 West Main Street Russellville, AR 72801-3614 Phone: 501-968-2354  

Perry’s Passin’ Thru Bed, Barn & Brew Jacci Perry 21365 Perry Road Springdale, AR 72764 479-756-6969 Location: east of Springdale, AR. Facilities: 5 stall barn with wash bay. Pets are welcomed. It’s $20/night for stall/&hookups or $135/master bedroom/bath & $90/guest bedroom/bath.  

Poteau Ranger District Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 2255 Waldron, AR 72958 (501) 637-4174 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Arizona Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Bear Wallow Wilderness 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: From Alpine, take US 191 south for 30 miles to Forest Road 25. 

Elevation: 9093 ft. 11,080 acres Ponderosa pine forest. The Bear Wallow 

Creek flows year-around. Season: roads may not be open in winter 

Users: hike, horse 

Blue Crossing 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 22 miles southeast of Alpine on US 180, then on Forest 

Route 281. Elevation 6200ft. Description: 4 camping sites. No horse facilities 

Access to the Blue Range Primitive Area. Season: April – November 

Users: hike, horse 

Blue Range Primitive Area 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: 520-339-4384 

Directions: South of Alpine on US 191 or Forest Route 201. 193,762-acre 

Description: rugged mountains, steep canyons, and ridges. The Mogollon 

Rim crosses the area from east to west. Season: May- October 

Users: hike, horse 

Escudilla National Recreation Trail 

Alpine Ranger District 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: 520-339-4384 

Direction: From the town of Alpine, drive north on US 191 to Forest Road 

56, go right, travel 4 miles to Terry Flat, turn left past Tool Box Draw, from 

here it is 1/2 mile to the trailhead. Three miles of well-marked trails 

Description: aspen groves, forest and meadows in the White Mountains. 

Season: May – October Users: hike, horse 

Escudilla Wilderness 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: From Alpine go northeast on US 191 and forest road 56 for 11 miles 

Season: May – October Users: horse, hike 

 
Hannagan 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 23 miles south of Alpine on US 191. Elevation. 9100 ft 

Facilities: 8 camp sites, No horse facilities Access to Blue Range Primitive Area. 

Season: May-October Users: hike, horse 

KP Cienega 

Alpine Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

P.O. Box 469 

Alpine, AZ 85920 

Phone: (520) 339-4384 

Directions: Located 29 miles southwest of Alpine on US 191 and forest road 155 

Elevation: 9000 ft Facilities: 5 camping units, Corrals. Trailhead access to Blue 

Range Primitive Area. Season: May-September Users: hike, horse 

Lost Dutchman State Park 

Apache Junction, AZ 

Phone: (602) 982-4485 

Mailing address: 

Arizona State Parks 

1300 W. Washington 

Phoenix, AZ 85007 

Directions: Travel east from Apache Junction on US Highway 88, turn north and go 

5 miles to the State Park. Located at the base of the Superstition Mountains. 

Season: year round Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

BS Ranch     
Bob & Susan Walter 
44099 Palo Verde 
PO Box 784 
Bouse, Az. 85325 
Tel:  928-851-2247     
  

Electric hookup, sewer, water, phone, internet, washing machine 

2 round pens, 5 covered pipe corrals, large run out area, open desert and mountain riding–miles and miles of open road 

Cedar Bench Wilderness 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From I-17 take exit 278, take forest road 372 east (off forest road 136). 

Elevation: 4500-6700 feet. 16,005 acres Two trails Season: year round 

Users: hike, horse 

Fossil Springs Wilderness 

Beaver Creek Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

P.O. Box 670 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4421 

Directions: From I- 17 travel south to AZ 260 then to forest road 708. 

Season: summer Users: hike, horse 

Mingus Mountain Trailhead 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 E. Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: 520.567.4121 

Directions: From Jerome go southwest for 6 miles on AZ 89A, 3 miles 

southeast on Forest Route 104 Elevation: 7600 ft. Trailhead to the 

Woodchute Wilderness. Season: May- October Fee 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Pine Mountain Wilderness 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From I-17 go east on County Road 171 and then onto forest 

road 68. Acres: 20,100 Description: desert mountains, mesas and 

canyons. 6 maintained trails. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Potato Patch Trailhead 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 E. Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: 520.567.4121 

Direction: From Jerome travel southwest for 7 miles on AZ 89A & .5 mile 

on forest road 106. 7000` elevation. Trailhead accesses Woodchute 

Wilderness. Season: May – October Fees Users: hike, horse 

Mazatzal Wilderness 

Cave Creek Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

P. O. Box 5068 

Carefree, AZ 85377 

Phone: (602) 488-3441 

Directions: From Camp Verde, take AZ 260 to forest road 708 then to 

forest road 502. Elevation: 2060 ft – 7903 ft Acres: 252,500 

Discription: Sonoran desert and uplands, canyons, pinyon and juniper 

The trail that follows the verde river is a favorite with equestrians. 

The Mazatzal Divide Route, runs 29 miles through the center of the 

wilderness. Not all trails are considered appropriate for horses. 

Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Woodchute Wilderness 

Verde Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

300 East Highway 260 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: From Cottonwood, go west 10 miles on AZ 60. Acres: 5,923 

Elevation: 5,500 ft – 7,800 ft. Description: spectacular views of the San 

Francisco Peaks One maintained trail. No horse facilities Season: 

March – October Users: hike, horse  

Campground Buena Tierra 

1995 S. Cox Road 

Casa Grande, AZ 85222 

(520) 836-3500 Toll Free: (888) 520-8360 Fax: (520) 836-9723 

Description: With over 100 campsites, some very large, Campground Buena 

Tierra gives you privacy and room to relax. There is a large picnic area, a 

volleyball court and huge fire pits that are ideal for groups or just one or 

two persons. Alone or with friends, feel free to explore the many riding 

trails which are perfect for biking, hiking and horseback riding (we have 

horse corrals here for overnighters and seasonal campers alike). 

Full Circle Ranch Bed and Breakfast Inn 

40205 North 26th Street 

Cave Creek, Arizona 85027 

Ph:(623) 465-7570 

Fax:(623) 465-7579    

Apache Creek Wilderness 

Prescott National Forest 

735 North Highway 89 

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Phone: (520) 636-2302 

Directions: From Prescott, take County Road 5 to County Road 8 to 95A, 

which is an unpaved four wheel drive road. Elevations: 5200 to 6900 feet. 

Description: Rolling hills, conifers, and riparian areas. There are no maintained 

trails . No horse facilities   Season: year round Users: hike, horse

 

Juniper Mesa Wilderness 

Chino Valley Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

735 North Highway 89 

Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Phone: (520) 636-2302 

Directions: From I-40 take exit 109 south on Anvil Rock Road (forest road 125). 

Elevation: 5,600 feet – 7,000 feet Description: Mesa and canyons. No water. 

7 maintained trails. Season: year round No horse facilities Users: hike, horse 

Chiricahua Wilderness 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Road 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Willcox, take AZ 186 south to Chiricahua National Monument, 

and then go east on forest road 42. 10,290 acre. Season: year around 

Users: hike, horse 

Cochise Stronghold Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Sunsites travel west on US 191 and 7 miles on forest road 84 

Elevation: 5000 ft.   Season: year round Fees  Users: hike, horse 

Pinery Canyon Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal, travel west on forest road 42 for 18 miles. 

Elevation 7000 ft. Season: year round Users: hike, bike, horse 

Rustler Park Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal, travel west on forest road 42D for 18 miles 

Elevation: 8500 ft. Trailhead to the Chiricahua Wilderness. 

Season: April-November Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

Stewart Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal travel southwest for 2 miles on forest road 42. 

Elevation: 5100 ft Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Sunny Flat Trailhead 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Canyon Rd. 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Portal go southwest on forest road 42 for 3 miles 

Elevation: 5200 ft Season: year round Fees Users: hike, bike, horse 

West Turkey Creek 

Douglas Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

3081 N. Leslie Rd 

Douglas, AZ 85607 

Phone: (520) 364-3468 

Directions: From Willcox, travel southeast on AZ 186 and 181, then on 

forest road 42 for 23 miles Elevation: 5900 ft Season: year round 

Users hike, bike, horse 

And The Horse You Rode In On B & B 

Deb Scott 

P.O. Box 158 

Dragoon, AZ 85609 

phone: (520) 826-5410 fax: (520) 826-1078 

Located on 600+ acres one hour east of Tucson in the foothills of the Dragoon Mts. 2400 West Dragoon 

Rd. Dragoon, AZ (I-10 Exit 318, then 7.3 miles on Dragoon Rd) Four guest rooms, ten guest stalls and 

a round pen. Ride out right from our corrals. 

Strayhorse Campground and Trailhead 

Clifton Ranger District 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest 

HC1, Box 733 

Duncan, AZ 85534 

Phone: (520)687-1301 

Directions: Located 26 miles south of Alpine on US 191 Elevation: 8200 ft. 

Facilities: 7 camping units with picnic tables, grills and corrals. Two major 

trails: Highline National Recreation Trail and Raspberry Trail 

Season: April – November Users: hike, horse 

Rancho Milagro Bed and Breakfast 

P.O. Box 981, 11 East Camino Del Corral 

Sonoita, AZ 85637 

Elgin, Arizona 

520-455-0381 

Innkeepers: Karen Leonard and Michael Johnson 

Kachina Parks Wilderness 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Hwy. 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff take 180 north to forest road 516. Elevation: 7,400 ft -12,643 ft. 

Humphreys Peak, the highest point in AZ. Season: May- October Users: hike, horse

 

Coconino National Forest 

Supervisor`s Office 

2323 E. Greenlaw Lane 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

(520) 527-3600 FAX 527-3620 

Little Elden Springs Campground/Trailhead 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Highway 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff, travel northeast on US 89 and forest road 556 for 5 miles. Elevation 7200 ft. 

Facilities: 16 camp sites, horse facilities. Season: May-September Fees Reservations accepted 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Red Rock Secret Mountain Wilderness 

Peaks Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

5075 N. Highway 89 

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Phone: (520) 526-0866 

Directions: From Flagstaff travel south for 20 miles, the wilderness can be reached off Route 66/ forest 

road 231, US 89A and forest road 152, FR 152D, FR152C, and 525. Elevation: 2800 ft – 9000 ft. 

Description: red rock formations, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and century-old homesteads. Season: March 

-October Users: hike, horse 

Indian Hollow Trailhead 

North Kaibab Ranger District 

Kaibab National Forest 

P.O. Box 248 

Fredonia, AZ 86022 

Phone: (520) 643-7395 

Directions: From Fredonia, go south for 50 miles taking routes 22 to 425 to 232 Elevation: 6000 ft. 

Wilderness access trailhead Season: May-November Users: hike, horse 

Saddle Mountain Wilderness 

North Kaibab Ranger District 

Kaibab National Forest 

P.O. Box 248 

Fredonia, AZ 96202 

Phone: (520) 643-7395 

Directions: From Jacob Lake, take AZ 67 to forest road 610 & FR 611. Elevation: 6000 ft – 8000 ft. 

This wilderness borders Grand Canyon National Park. Season: May – October Users: hike, horse 

Icehouse CCC Campground/Trailhead 

Globe Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

Route 1, Box 33 

Globe, AZ 88501 

Phone: (520) 402-6200 

Directions: From Globe go south for 6 miles on forest road 112. Elevation: 4,000 ft. Season: year 

round NO Horse facilities Users: hike, horse 

Salt River Canyon Wilderness 

Globe Ranger District 

Tonto National Forest 

Route 1, Box 33 

Globe, AZ 85501 

Phone: (602) 225-5200 

Directions: From Globe, travel north AZ 288. Acres: 32,100 Description: very rugged, and fantastic 

vistas. Elevations: 2,200 ft – 4,200 ft. Access to this wilderness is difficult, and is mostly done at the Salt 

River. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Grand Canyon National Park 

P. O. Box 129 

Grand Canyon, AZ 86023 

Phone: (520) 638-7888 

Location: North of Williams on Arizona State Highway 64, north on US Highway 180. The north rim can be 

accessed from Jacob Lake via a scenic byway. Season: year round Fees Reservations: yes 

Users: hike, bike, horse 

Kehl Springs Trailhead 

Mogollon Rim Center 

Coconino National Forest 

H.C. 31, Box 300 

Happy Jack, AZ 86024 

Phone: (520) 477-2255 

Directions: From Happy Jack travel south on AZ 87 and then travel for 29 miles on forest road 300 

Elevation: 7500 ft Season: year round Users: hike, bike, horse 

Miller Peak Wilderness 

Sierra Vista Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

5990 S. Hwy 92 

Hereford, AZ 85615 

Phone: (520) 378-0311 

Location: Located 6 miles south of Sierra Vista in the Huachuca Mountains Elevation: 5200ft – 9466 ft. 

21 well maintained trails Season: year round Users hike, horse 

Ramsey Vista Campground/Trailhead 

Sierra Vista Ranger District 

Coronado National Forest 

5990 South Highway 92 

Hereford, AZ 85615 

Phone: (520) 378-0311 

Directions: From Sierra Vista, travel southwest on AZ 92 and forest road 368 for 14 miles. Elevation 

7200 ft Season: year round Fees No horse facilities Users: hike, bike, horse 

Arrastra Mountain Wilderness 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Wickenburg travel northwest on US Highway 93 take the Bagdad turnoff (Hwy 97). 

Elevations: to 5000 feet. Season: year round Users hike, horse 

Mount Nutt Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Kingman, take -I40 south for 3 miles to the Oatman Road exit. Travel 10 miles west to 

Navaho Road turn west on Navaho Road, continue 2 miles Description: steep canyons. Season: year 

round Users: hike, horse 

Mount Wilson Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Ave. 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 692-4400 

Directions: From Kingman, travel 50 miles north on US 93 to the Temple Bar Road, continue on paved 

road for 8 miles to an unpaved jeep trail. Elevation: 5445 feet at the summit of Mount Wilson. Season: 

year round Users: hike, horse 

Mohave County Fairgrounds 

2600 Fairgrounds Blvd. 

KINGMAN, AZ 86401 

Ph: 520-753-2636 Office:520-753-1904 

Directions: From I-40 take Stockton Hill Rd. exit Facilities: 250 – 10×10 outdoor covered box stalls, 

water available year round, and RV hookups. Open 24 hours Night watch person on duty. Fees 

Tres Alamos Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 85401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: Take Highway 93 to the Lake Alamo Road, travel 6.5 miles west to an intersection, take the 

right fork, and go 7 miles to the wilderness. Acres: 8300 Description: ridges, canyons, and washes 

Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Upper Burro Creek Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Directions: From Phoenix take US 93 to highway 97 ( Bagdad turnoff) then take the road to Upper Burro 

Creek. This road is steep and requires a four wheel drive. Description: Acres: 27,440 Season: year 

round Users: hike, horse 

Wabayuma Peak Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Ave 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 692-4400 

Directions: : From Hualapai Mountain County Park go 20 miles on BLM road 2123. Acres: 40,000 

.Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Warm Springs Wilderness 

Kingman Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2475 Beverly Avenue 

Kingman, AZ 86401 

Phone: (520) 757-3161 

Gibraltar Mountain Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Avenue 

Lake Havasu, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Directions: From I-10 west, exit at Quartizite, take AZ 95 toward Parker, to AZ 72, turning west toward 

Parker, 2 miles south of Parker turn east onto Shea Road and follow this paved road for 5 miles. 

Description: volcanic rock, and sandy canyons. Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Harcuvar Mountains Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Ave. 

Lake Havasu City, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Directions: From Wenden travel north on AZ 60 to Alamo Dam Access road. Elevations: 2400 feet 

5100 feet. Season: year round Users: horse, hike 

Rawhide Mountains Wilderness 

Lake Havasu Field Office 

Bureau of Land Management 

2610 Sweetwater Ave. 

Lake Havasu City, AZ 86406 

Phone: (520) 505-1200 

Location: From Kingman travel south on I-40 for 22 miles to Yucca, take Alamo Road. Description: A 

river, deep gorge, mountains, side canyons and waterfalls Season: year round Users: hike, horse 

Castle Creek Wilderness 

Bradshaw Ranger District 

Prescott National Forest 

2230 East Highway 69 

Prescott, AZ 86301 

Phone: (520) 445-7253 

Directions: From Prescott, take forest road 61 south to forest road 56 to forest road 52. Elevation: 2800 

ft – 7000 ft. 25,517-acres. Spectacular views Nine maintained trails. Season: year round Users: 

hike, horse 

West Clear Creek Wilderness 

Beaver Creek Ranger District 

Coconino National Forest 

HC 64, Box 240 

Rimrock, AZ 86335 

Phone: (520) 567-4121 

Directions: 35 miles east of Camp Verde. Trail starts at Bull Pen Ranch Season: March- October 

Users: hike, horse 

Categories: Blog Vacation Spots

Alabama Parks, Campgrounds, and Trails

We all love taking the horses out locally, but the best part of owning a horse is the opportunities for adventure. Luckily, the United States is full of horse-friendly outdoor recreation areas perfect for the occasional day trip or longer vacation. We are producing a series to bring you information about the horse-friendly parks, campgrounds, and trails across the United States. 

Russell Cave National Monument 3729 County Road 98, Bridgeport, AL, 35740, Phone: 205-495-2672 Located in the northeastern corner of Alabama close to the Tennessee border. Can be accessed via U.S. Highway 72. Users: hikers, horses.  

Edgar Hood 459 Brownsboro Road Brownsboro, AL 35741 256-883-8615 barn, 256-776-9177 Web Site: http://www.3hstables.com E-mail: threehst@knology.net Bold Destiny Bedford V Cash Memorial Horse Trail Tuskegee National Forest, 334-727-2652. Directions: From I-85, take exit 42 and go east on AL 186. Turn left on forest road 905 (just past the Forest Service office sign). Trailhead is at the “T” of forest Road 905 and forest road 906. Trailhead has a small parking area. 14 miles of trail Description: rolling hills and woods. Overnight camping permits needed Users: hike, horse  

Caude Kelly State Park Uriah, AL Directions: From I-65 take Hwy 21 north for 15 miles, to a bridge located on the county line, cross the bridge and take the next right. Trails Fees  

Little River Canyon WMA Ft. Payne, Directions: From Ft. Payne take Hwy 35 south, after crossing the Little River Canyon, take the first paved road to the left (County Rd 103). Trail head is 1/2 mile on the left. Trail head has small parking area, 30 + miles of marked and unmarked trails. Description: views, rolling hills, rocks, and river crossings. 

Categories: Vacation Spots

Interstate Travel Health Requirements

Horses rarely need to travel long distances, but some situations require interstate travel. Whether you need to see a specialized veterinarian or are traveling to a fair or horse show, you’ll need to make sure your animal(s) has the tests and health requirements necessary to travel. Below is a list of each state and the health tests and inspections you need to secure before traveling.  

State EIA Test Requirement Certificate of 
Veterinary 
Inspection* 
Temp. 
Reading 
Alabama Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
Alaska Yes (6 months) (B) Yes (ii,vi) No 
Arizona Yes (12 months) (B) Yes (iv, +) No 
Arkansas Yes (12 months) (B, C, D) Yes Yes 
California Yes (6 months) (B, C) Yes No 
Canada Yes (6 months) Yes (iii) Yes 
Colorado Yes (12 months) (H, C)+ Yes No 
Connecticut Yes (12 months) (J) Yes (iv) Yes 
Delaware Yes (12 months) (B, D) Yes Yes 
Florida Yes (12 months) (B, C)+ Yes (iv, vi) Yes 
Georgia Yes (12 months) (B, C) Yes Yes 
Hawaii Yes (3 months) Yes (vi) No 
Idaho Yes (6 months) (B, C) Yes No 
Illinois Yes (12 months) (A, B, C)+ Yes No 
Indiana Yes (12 months) (C) Yes No 
Iowa Yes (6 months) (B) Yes No 
Kansas Yes (12 months) (B, C) Yes No 
Kentucky Yes (12 months) (B, C, D, G,) Yes No** 
Louisiana Yes (12 months) Yes No 
Maine Yes (6 months) (B) Yes (v) No 
Maryland Yes (12 months) (B, C)+ Yes (i, iv) No** 
Massachusetts Yes (12 months) (B, C, D, G,) Yes (iii, iv, +, *) Yes 
Michigan Yes (6 months) Yes No 
Minnesota Yes (12 months) (B, H) Yes No 
Mississippi Yes (12 months) (A, C, G)+ Yes (iv, v) No 
Missouri Yes (12 months) (B, C) Yes (vi)*** No 
Montana Yes (12 months)(C, L)(6 months)(vii)+ Yes (ii, vii, v) No 
Nebraska Yes (12 months) (E) Yes No 
Nevada Yes (6 months) (B, C, G, I) Yes No 
New Hampshire Yes (6 months) (G) Yes No 
New Jersey Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
New Mexico Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
New York Yes (12 months) Yes (vi) No 
North Carolina Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
North Dakota Yes (12 months) (B, E, C) Yes No 
Ohio Yes (6 months) (A)+ Yes * Yes 
Oklahoma Yes (12 months) (C) Yes + No 
Oregon Yes (6 months) (B, C, L) Yes (ii, vii) No 
Pennsylvania Yes (12 months) (B, C, G) Yes No 
Puerto Rico Yes (6 months) Yes (i, vi) No 
Rhode Island Yes (12 months) (B) Yes (vi) Yes 
South Carolina Yes (12 months) (B, C, G) Yes (iii, iv, v) No 
South Dakota Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
Tennessee Yes (12 months) (B, D, L) Yes No 
Texas Yes (12 months) (C, G)+ Yes (ii, iv) No 
Utah Yes (12 months) Yes (iv) No 
Vermont Yes (12 months) (B) Yes No 
Virginia Yes (12 months) Yes No 
Virgin Islands Yes (12 months) (H)     
Washington Yes (12 months) (B, K) Yes (vii) No 
West Virginia Yes (6 months) (F) Yes No 
Wisconsin Yes (within calendar year) (C) Yes No 
Wyoming Yes (12 months) (B, C) Yes No 

+ When EIA test is required, laboratory name and address, ascension number, and test date with results must be included. 

*Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) filed with the state veterinarian in state of origin is required. 

**Recommended 

***Under revision 

Categories: Blog

Buyer’s Guide: Different Types of Horse Saddles

For the most comfortable ride on a horse you need the right saddle to sit on. The saddle goes over the horses back and distributes your weight. Having it fitted properly on your horse is essential for both horse and riders sake.

There are a number of different saddles you can buy that are designed for specific purposes. Generally there are the English Riding and Western saddles. The objective when determining what to buy is to decide what you want it for, An example of your choices include pleasure riding, jumping or dressage. That way you already narrow your choice down to your purpose.

Before buying your saddle make sure that you are able to return it if it does not fit your horse. The best way to ensure it fits properly is to have it fitted by a saddle maker or saddle fitter. However there are some rules of thumb techniques you can use if there is no one available to help you.

You can measure the width of your horses back and the width of the inside/underneath of the saddle. Make sure that between the pummel of the saddle and the top of the horses shoulder (wither) you can place three fingers. So it is not just as simple as getting measurements, the real test is putting the saddle on the horse.

When it is properly fitted it will allow the horse to move freely with no strain or restriction. Minor fitting problems can be helped with the use of a pad or blanket. This type of padding will not correct or compensate for a poor-fitting saddle so take your time and get it right.

It is important that it fits and is comfortable for both horse and rider. A saddle that fits improperly can put pressure on incorrect points on the horse, resulting in pain for the horse.

Saddle sores can result and as a consequence your horse will strongly object to having it put on. There is also a risk to the rider as some horses have been known to buck off the rider due to pain caused by an improperly fitted saddle.

All saddles need to be kept clean and dry. Store it under cover, away from weather and dust. Regular use over time will give way to wear and tear, you should recheck your saddle for a proper fit every couple of years.

You can also have some padding added, not to mention the fact that your horse will develop and change over the years therefore minor adjustments should be made. With proper care and handling your saddle will last a long time.

Categories: Equipment

Buyer’s Guide: Different Types of Horse Bridles

Bridles are used for riding and driving horses (pulling a wagon or cart) and allow the rider to communicate with the horse. Depending on your style of riding you can purchase an English or Western Bridle. You certainly want to buy a bridle that fits your horse properly.

English Bridles have a noseband (leather strap that buckles around the nose of the horse,) these reins are then buckled to one another at the ends. Western Bridles generally have no noseband and the reins are “split”, they do not buckle at the end. Western Bridles are usually decorative with features on the leather and they can also be adorned with silver.

Double bridles are used for English Riding in the dressage discipline and use two bits in the mouth at once, a snaffle bit and a curb bit. The two bits allow the rider to have very precise control of the horse and are usually seen in top levels of dressage.

Effective riding occurs when the horse receives commands through the reins. Pulling on the reins can be used to steer or stop the horse. If you have done your homework and learned how to ride, you should not need to yank on the bridle. You must remember that your horse’s mouth is sensitive and you could hurt him if you yank too hard which could cause your horse to act out and resist the bridle.

A bridle that does not fit correctly could also hurt the horse. Leather straps could chafe and the mouth could be pinched by the bit. If you do not know how to fit a bridle correctly, ask your instructors, a knowledgeable horse person and even the sales clerk at the tack shop could help you.

It is always a good idea to start off using the gentlest type of tack possible, such as a cavesson noseband and snaffle bit for English riding. If you have difficulty knowing what would work best for your horse, find out if you could try out different styles, even borrow a bit.

There are a number of different bits and nosebands which give you more control; however they are more severe on the horse. If you are not an experienced horse person

always consult a horse trainer before buying a different bit or noseband for your bridle.

The cost of bridles can vary considerably. You can visit your local tack store to look at the styles and types. Tack stores often have used tack for sale which is also an option. Keep in mind that you really need to buy a quality bridle. Bridles made of cheap leather or a second hand bridle with a lot of wear and tear is easy to break.

You can buy a bridle at your local feed and tack shop. You could take a look locally and then shop and compare prices online too. Used bridles can also be found in your local newspaper under the classified ads.

Categories: Equipment

The Personality of Popular Horse Saddles

Horse Saddle – I am the lovely piece of work placed on the back of horses for riders to sit upon. I ensure stability for both riders and horses, and distribute the weight of riders evenly. I come in several forms, numerous enough to make your head spin. My variations are shaped in regard to location [e.g English, Australian, Western, German etc], tree type [e.g Wade, flex Tree, treeless etc], production technique [handmade custom or manufactured], material [Leather or synthetic], activity [parading, roping, show, endurance, racing, trail, reining etc] and several others.

English Saddle – I am the saddle used to ride horses in “English riding” disciplines world wide. Though with an English background, I am not limited in use by English speaking countries or in England alone. I have features that make me unique and stand out as envy in the equestrian world. My Stirrups can be detached from the saddle [in case of an emergency]. I have a piece of equipment known as a girth, which is used to keep me in place on a horse. It passes under the barrel of the equine, usually attached to me on both sides by two or three leather straps called billets. My rare end has a subtle and not-too-obvious feature known as the Cantle [or Seat]: This is used to provide greater comfort and security to riders. I generally cover a small surface area compared to others, yet have proven to be more effective with simplicity. Much of the weight bearing area in me is supported by a large internal flocking inside the panels.

Australian Saddle – I am the saddle used for activities requiring long hours on the horse. I came as a variation of the English saddle eons ago, but have soon developed my own uniqueness as time went by. I have a distinct feature known as the Knee pad [aka ‘poleys’] to provide security for riders who ride in rough conditions & spend long hours on horses. The ‘poleys’ are usually located around riders thighs in front of the saddle. I was designed to cater for conditions ranging from soothing to rigid. My seats are deeper than the typical English saddle and my Cantle higher. I am kept on with a girth attached to the billets under the flaps.

Western Saddle – I am the saddle used for Western Riding in the United States of America, mainly in the ‘western’ part. I am often tagged with the ‘cowboy’ name. I was designed to provide both security & comfort to riders and their horses, traveling long hours in harsh environment. I fancy being flashy and different. I tend not to like ’simplicity’ because I pride myself at being unique and robust. I don’t call my girths ‘girths’ [you bet] but cinch. My Stirrups cannot be detached from me in an emergency, but instead I have a wider tread; combined with the rider’s high-heeled boots- this design minimizes the risk that the rider will slip through the stirrups during a fall, and the rider being dragged. My Cantle is one of the most revealing of all horse saddles, providing greater comfort and security. I cover a wider surface area than the Typical English or Australian saddle. My cinch is tied on with a flat strap of leather or nylon known as the latigo. I have no padding between the tree and the external leather and fleece skirting… Okay, okay, it seems I brag a lot, but really, I’m truly unique because I am the most ‘modified’ and thoroughly customized to suit riders tastes. And I am often used for ’show’ purposes. Yeah, I show-off a lot! But there are no ‘best’ saddles anywhere, only suitable and familiar ones.

Horse – I am the tamed animal Humans ride upon. I know not of western, English, Australian, Portuguese, German or even youth saddles. I only know it when my back hurts if the seating equipment placed on it pokes my spine or is not properly fitted- I ‘neighhhhhhh’ at the rider, indicating pain and discomfort- and I know when it does not. I love humans, and would give my full agility and beauty to the ones who seat on me properly.

Categories: Equipment

Horse Travel Vacation Spots: Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in North Dakota, is a must-visit destination for horse lovers. These animals represent a huge attraction for many of the park’s visitors. The feral horses here do not fall under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, but are instead managed by existing park regulations. For many years, the National Park Service attempted to remove all horses from the park, but the policy was reversed in 1970 when the horse was recognized as part of the historical setting.

The park is home to numerous bands, or groups, of horses, representing the experience Theodore Roosevelt may have had during the open range ranching era. The feral horses are preserved as a cultural resource. During the summer months, the horses may be seen grazing throughout the park. They are most often seen along the park boundary from Interstate 94. They can also be seen from high points, such as the Painted Canyon Overlook and Buck Hill. While there are no official horse tours operating inside the park, visitors are likely to see bands while hiking and exploring.

The feral horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park move in bands of 5-15 animals. Each group has an established social hierarchy. Once formed, the social group will remain remarkably stable and often range within an established territory. Foals are born in the spring after an 11-month gestation period. Horse numbers have been historically managed at the park through periodic roundups. Removed horses are sold at public auction. However, the park is exploring alternative methods for herd management, including contraceptives, low-stress livestock herding, corral trapping, an adoption program, and various genetics research.

The Park advises visitors to exercise extreme caution while attempting to observe feral horses closely. Binoculars are advised for optimal viewing. Horses have a very acute sense of smell, hearing, and sight, and they are extremely wary of humans. Visitors are prohibited from feeding, chasing, harassing, and otherwise approaching the horses.

 

Categories: Vacation Spots